Bombay Wraps with Apple Raisin Chutney & Quick Pickled Onions

Bombay Wraps with Apple Raisin Chutney & Quick Pickled Onions | The Full Helping

These Bombay wraps with apple raisin chutney & quick pickled onions are a great example of “semi-homemade” cooking, which I appreciate as a happy compromise between my love of all things scratch-cooked, and the fact that my cooking time has been running short lately.

The chutney is prepared from scratch—an easy weekend project, if you can keep an eye on a pot as it simmers away on the stovetop. The chapatis are optional: I ended up making them myself because a) I’d never made chapati before, and it was a fun project, and b) I didn’t have any wraps on hand, whereas I did have a big bag of flour, salt, and water.

Bombay Wraps with Apple Raisin Chutney & Quick Pickled Onions | The Full Helping

Those tasty, tender veggie burgers you see? Those are the Bombay veggie burgers from Dr. Praeger’s Sensible Foods. A wholesome base of peas, carrots, onions, oat bran, and edamame, seasoned well with curry, cumin, mustard seed, coriander, and turmeric. The burgers are just assertive enough to hold their own with the tart chutney and pickled onions in these wraps, but they’re not overly spicy or hot, either.

Bombay Wraps with Apple Raisin Chutney & Quick Pickled Onions | The Full Helping
Bombay Wraps with Apple Raisin Chutney & Quick Pickled Onions | The Full Helping

In the last few months, I’ve had a chance to play around with Dr. Praeger’s plant-forward, convenient burgers and hash browns, using them in lots of semi-homemade applications, from breakfast bowls to summer rolls.

In this dish, as in others, the burgers are a perfect way to easily complete an otherwise homemade meal: they do the heavy lifting for you, which can be the difference between lunch or dinner that feels like a pleasure to prepare, and something overly arduous.

Bombay Wraps with Apple Raisin Chutney & Quick Pickled Onions | The Full Helping

These wraps feature my quick pickled onions (a simple recipe, which you can find here, but you could use very thinly sliced, raw red onion, too), fresh cilantro, the Bombay burgers, and a seasonal, apple raisin chutney. The chutney is definitely on the sweeter, jammier side of the chutney spectrum—and fairly untraditional—but I love it, and I’ve been making it with apples or pears for a couple years now.

My original plan was to grab some whole wheat wraps or tortillas for the recipe, but making my own pita bread lately has shown me that homemade flatbread-making is worth the time. A single recipe usually yields quite a few breads, which can be frozen and popped out of the freezer whenever one is needed. I’ve found it to be worthwhile, not only because the bread is inevitably more tender and tastier, but also in terms of cost.

Bombay Wraps with Apple Raisin Chutney & Quick Pickled Onions | The Full Helping

It’s easy to find chapatis recipes online and in books. I turned to The New Laurel’s Kitchen—a book Maria introduced me to, which I’ve come to love for many reasons—for inspiration, adjusting quantities and then filling in my how-to knowledge with online videos and instructions. I found the process to be relatively simple, even if my chapatis didn’t quite puff up the way they’re supposed to (I think this is the sort of thing that will get easier with practice).

If you’d like an awesome, visual run-through of the process, you should check out Suguna’s video. And if you’re not up for bread-making, no problem: this recipe will work with whole grain/sprouted wraps, pita, or your favorite naan.

Bombay Wraps with Apple Raisin Chutney & Quick Pickled Onions | The Full Helping

Bombay Wraps with Apple Raisin Chutney & Quick Pickled Onions
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Recipe type: main dish
Cuisine: vegan, gluten free option, tree nut free
Author: Gena Hamshaw
Prep time: 20 mins
Cook time: 30 mins
Total time: 50 mins
Serves: 4 servings (8 wraps)
Ingredients
For the chutney:
  • ¾ cup apple cider vinegar
  • ¾ cup apple cider (you can substitute apple or orange juice)
  • ⅓ cup (heaping) brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons fresh, grated ginger (or 1 teaspoon ground ginger)
  • 1 large or 2 small cloves garlic, grated or minced
  • 1 pound apples, peeled and chopped
  • ½ cup raisins
For the chapatis*:
  • 1 cup whole wheat or spelt flour
  • 1 cup unbleached, all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¾ cup warm water
  • Vegetable oil (such as coconut, grapeseed, or safflower)
For the wraps:
Instructions
  1. To make the chutney, heat the cider, vinegar, and sugar in a large saucepan, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Add all remaining ingredients and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer, uncovered, for 25-30 minutes, or until the apples are totally tender and breaking down. Allow the chutney to cool a bit before transferring it to jars (or an airtight container) and storing in the fridge for up to a week. Makes 2 cups (recipe can be doubled).
  2. To make the chapati, combine the flours and salt in a large mixing bowl. Add the water, little by little, using your hands to incorporate, until you have a rough ball of dough. Transfer the dough to a floured surface and knead for 10 minutes, or until the dough is smooth. Place the dough in an oiled bowl and cover with a damp towel. Allow it to rest for 20 minutes.
  3. Cut the dough ball into 8 evenly sized pieces. Shape each into a small ball with your hands, then use a rolling pin to roll it into a very thin, flat circle (about 6-7 inches diameter). Stack the circles on a baking sheet with layers of paper towel in between them, to prevent sticking.
  4. Heat a large cast-iron or non-stick skillet over medium high heat and coat it lightly with oil. Add one of the disks of dough. Cook for about 20-30 seconds, until you see some bubbles appear on the dough. Flip the dough over and begin pressing on it firmly with a spatula—this will help it to puff up the way it’s supposed to! Keep flipping and pressing until the dough has puffed and both sides have some brown spots. Remove the bread from the skillet, wrapping it in cloth to keep it warm. Repeat with the remaining dough circles. Freeze any chapati you don’t wish to consume within a day.
  5. To assemble the wraps, cook the Dr. Praeger’s Bombay Burgers according to package instructions. Cut each burger in half. Place a chapati on a flat surface and place a burger along the center. Top it with a few tablespoons chutney, followed by some cilantro and pickled onions. Serve.
Notes
In place of making chapati, you can use whole grain or gluten-free wraps of choice.
3.5.3226

Bombay Wraps with Apple Raisin Chutney & Quick Pickled Onions | The Full Helping

I like this recipe because it got me out of my comfort zone (a new flatbread) while also cutting me some slack (having the pros take care of the burgers). And I love all of the flavor contrast here: the slight bitterness of cilantro, the sour onions, the sweet chutney, and the very savory burgers. What a great, vibrant lunch, with plenty of leftovers for me to enjoy this week.

Hope you’ll try the wraps as they are, with your own touches. They’d also be great with my homemade cashew raita, if that’s more your style than chutney. Enjoy, and I look forward to taking a break for words and recipe love with you this coming weekend 🙂

xo

This post is sponsored by Dr. Praeger’s Purely Sensible Foods. All opinions are my own, and I’m a huge fan of this brand’s easy vegan offerings. Thanks for your support!

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